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Researching Your Competition

How to choose products for amazon private label with Kevin King

Is Private Label still a viable business model in 2019?

It is still viable – if you can invent something, it does give you a major advantage.

PL still works but not in commodities.

And you need to differentiate. You can’t just put your logo on something from Alibaba.

Read the reviews and you’ll have to work with the manufacturer to fix that

You can differentiate with packaging, bundling, etc.

You have to put up a bit of a moat.

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320 Brand Analytics for Amazon Sellers with Danny McMillan

Brand Analytics for Amazon sellers

What is Brand Analytics?

Amazon Brand Analytics is a data tool provided by Amazon. It gives inside analytics on keywords in an understandable format.

Brand Analytics started in Amazon USA and has now been rolled out to the UK and European Amazon Seller Accounts.

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249 Chinese Sellers on Amazon – How to Beat Them! with Chris Rawlings of Judolaunch

If you missed parts one & two of my conversation with Chris, make sure you check them out here. If you’re all caught up, let’s jump right in. As you know, Chris is the founder and CEO of Judolaunch–a product launching service designed to help sellers infiltrate the international markets. Chris has already given us so much valuable information about starting an Amazon business and going international; today it’s all about how to compete with Chinese sellers on Amazon.

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167 Sponsored Products & Amazon PPC Q&A with Brian Johnson

We have, once again, Brian Johnson of PPC Scope and Sponsored Products Academy on the show. After we released the previous episodes I got so many questions that I had to get Brian back on. We’re going to do a Q&A session right now to address questions sent in from the listeners. Continue reading

153 Selling on Amazon.com with David Aggiss Part 1 of 2

Today on the show, I have one of the first contacts I made when starting this show, David Aggiss. I had him on, all the way back in November of 2015. Since then, he has given up the day job and is his own full-time boss. He has a few business, one of which being an Amazon business. We’re going to dive in and find out David’s strategy for selling on Amazon.com.

Getting Started selling on Amazon.com

David started learning about Amazon in April/May of 2015 and began receiving some training. In about four months, he started selling his own product. He took off quite well in Q4. At the time, incentivised reviews were still allowed so he made that a large part of his strategy. His sales exceeded his expectations going from 10 units a day to 30 on average. He launched his second product in Q4 last year and focused on his listing since incentivised reviews were no longer available.

Finding a product

There are a lot of techniques for finding products. David decided to simply look through Amazon. This is a great technique for finding good products. Look for lower prices and low competition items when first starting out. If you find a good product and the listing isn’t optimised, then there is definitely an opportunity for you to sweep in and take over. You can use Google Trends, Merchant Words to help you find what popular and what people are looking for.

David didn’t use any tools to find products, like Jungle Scout etc. He didn’t know what his products would be so he wouldn’t know what to search. Once he picked the products, he verified through Jungle Scout that there was a demand. Now he has about 5 products he’s working through launching.

He search Amazon to find his products. He narrowed his search to products between $15 and $50 and looked for products that interested him. If you are interested in the product then it’s easier to relate and figure out what those buyers are looking for. Then you can tailor your listing to those shoppers.

Selling on Amazon.com Post-Incentivised Reviews

Getting reviews has become much more difficult since Amazon banned incentivised reviews. With this new world, you have to pay more attention to reviews since you can no longer give products away in exchange for a review. One thing to pay attention to when getting started with a new product is the number a reviews your competition has. If they have thousands of reviews, it’s going to be much harder to compete because it is more difficult to reach a competitive level.

Make sure you competitors only have a hundred or so reviews so you can better compete. Then you can use other services to help get legitimate reviews. You can also try to get traffic coming in from off Amazon.Ads on Facebook, Google, and Bing are great places to start.

There are also ways you can use Amazon to boost your listing. Spending heavy on PPC at the beginning is a good way to drive traffic when selling on Amazon.com. Once your listing gets going, then you can cut back to where it’s profitable. One thing David mentioned was participating in Lightning Deals. These deals on put on by Amazon that offers their shoppers very good discounts for a very limited amount of time. There is a link underneath your Advertising tab on the main screen of Seller Central. It’s not all the time, but Amazon will offer you a Lightning Deal when it’s relevant. This is a great way to drive a lot of sellers to you listing and gives a nice boost to new products.

Amazon sets the parameters. They will tell you the time slot, the minimum number of units, and the sale price which is based on your sales history. David, for example, recently got a time slot for 1am to 7am. Not the best time as many people aren’t looking at Amazon so early in the morning. Despite that, he had an additional 40 sales from the deal.

137 Best Products to Sell Online with Greg Mercer – Part 3 of 5

Talking about the best products to sell online , Greg Mercer, Let’s back it up to how get ideas in the first place. Do you do that organically, or do you use some sort of tool?

To find possible best products to sell online, as Greg mentioned in the previous episode, you can look at Amazon’s best seller, or look for trends in your everyday life. If you have time and are cost conscience then that works. However, the Jungle Scout web app was created to solve that problem. There are a few tools in the Jungle Scout web app, which is different than the Chrome extension. It’s more like traditional software. It has a database tool which is a recreation of the Amazon catalog. It’s available for the European and North American marketplaces.

What they’ve done is rebuilt Amazon’s catalog so it’s more user-friendly for sellers. You are able to search by metrics that sellers care about. You can search for all products that sell more than 500 units, have less than 50 reviews, have a poor listing, and weigh less than 5 pounds. You can put all that in and get it down to 5000 listings. From there you can get ideas of the best products to sell online. What people are are some really obscure products that people would have never thought to look for.

Let’s talk about competition. I would imagine by the end of the year, a lot of people will be using the same tools when deciding what to sell online. A lot of people will be using the Jungle Scout suite trying to find the obvious products. How do we deal with the competition? You mentioned going for the obscure products, do you have any other ways to find the best products to sell online on Amazon?

There’s a few strategies you can implement. One is finding a product, and improving on it. This is the age old practice. Take an item people are already buying even though it’s crappy, and just improving upon it. That’s what’s great about this day an age. 20 years ago, big corporations had to spend a lot of money doing research to find this same information that any average Joe can get by reading product reviews.

Just find a product to sell online that is selling despite poor reviews. Then filter by 1-star reviews and find out what everyone hates about it. Then contact a factory in China and have them make this one simple change. Put it on Amazon, and now you getting 5-star reviews while your competitors are getting 3-4 star reviews.

You’ll also find that anything with a higher barrier of entry will have less competition. If it’s a larger item that need to come in containers, those will have less competition, but will come with headaches. More expensive items will have less competition. The U.S. is the most competitive out of all the markets, so Greg has been expanding into Europe. According to an Amazon representative, if you combine all the European stores, they do about as much volume as the U.S.