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137 Best Products to Sell Online with Greg Mercer – Part 3 of 5

Talking about the best products to sell online , Greg Mercer, Let’s back it up to how get ideas in the first place. Do you do that organically, or do you use some sort of tool?

To find possible best products to sell online, as Greg mentioned in the previous episode, you can look at Amazon’s best seller, or look for trends in your everyday life. If you have time and are cost conscience then that works. However, the Jungle Scout web app was created to solve that problem. There are a few tools in the Jungle Scout web app, which is different than the Chrome extension. It’s more like traditional software. It has a database tool which is a recreation of the Amazon catalog. It’s available for the European and North American marketplaces.

What they’ve done is rebuilt Amazon’s catalog so it’s more user-friendly for sellers. You are able to search by metrics that sellers care about. You can search for all products that sell more than 500 units, have less than 50 reviews, have a poor listing, and weigh less than 5 pounds. You can put all that in and get it down to 5000 listings. From there you can get ideas of the best products to sell online. What people are are some really obscure products that people would have never thought to look for.

Let’s talk about competition. I would imagine by the end of the year, a lot of people will be using the same tools when deciding what to sell online. A lot of people will be using the Jungle Scout suite trying to find the obvious products. How do we deal with the competition? You mentioned going for the obscure products, do you have any other ways to find the best products to sell online on Amazon?

There’s a few strategies you can implement. One is finding a product, and improving on it. This is the age old practice. Take an item people are already buying even though it’s crappy, and just improving upon it. That’s what’s great about this day an age. 20 years ago, big corporations had to spend a lot of money doing research to find this same information that any average Joe can get by reading product reviews.

Just find a product to sell online that is selling despite poor reviews. Then filter by 1-star reviews and find out what everyone hates about it. Then contact a factory in China and have them make this one simple change. Put it on Amazon, and now you getting 5-star reviews while your competitors are getting 3-4 star reviews.

You’ll also find that anything with a higher barrier of entry will have less competition. If it’s a larger item that need to come in containers, those will have less competition, but will come with headaches. More expensive items will have less competition. The U.S. is the most competitive out of all the markets, so Greg has been expanding into Europe. According to an Amazon representative, if you combine all the European stores, they do about as much volume as the U.S. 

123 Are your products beautiful?

Are your products beautiful?

If you are selling on Amazon, you are likely private labeling products, probably from China. Although, if you are in America then you might be looking at other alternatives in light of Trump’s plan to raise tariffs. For now, let’s assume you are importing from China. China makes some of the world’s worst products. China makes some of the greatest, such as the Apple iPhone. It’s equally possible to create terrible products as it is to create amazing ones since 80% of the world’s manufacturing happens there.

Have you got a design that is interesting? If not unique, is it at least beautiful? Are you sure you are really checking the quality of your manufacturing?

From the consumer stance, simply put, is your product beautiful? Does it work beautifully? Is it reliable? Is it amazing?

Today, I was out in London and came across the amazing building. It was once a school for choir boys that is now a youth hostel. What makes it truly beautiful is the detail. They put so much care into the details that it is immediately striking. When you really look at the detail, it is magical as well.

Now my question, is your product doing that for your customers? If not, you need to get on that. I am, by no means, an expert in product design, but my business partner and I have some products on their way from China and we are very excited about them. We order samples from about six suppliers and got eight samples from some suppliers. We went through a lot of trouble. We reviewed 60 suppliers! Some were dodgy and their prices came tumbling down from $15/unit to $3; some didn’t have solid business credentials, and we rejected them.

We have a whole complicated system that we use to check out a supplier thoroughly, and I can go into that later if you are interested, but the big thing is to get a sample! Check through different photos on Alibaba, or wherever. Get out of Alibaba, do some Googling, go out and get some samples in real life. Whatever you need to do to get a vision of what would be your perfect vision of you product.

Keep in mind what your market wants. I’m not saying to create something in a vacuum. Never do that! Do research. Look at demand. Look at demand depth. If here a lot of sales in training shoes, but 90% is Nike, forget it. If you want a company that you can sell down the line for two or three times yearly revenue. If, you want a brand that people are willing and excited to buy. When people see your product in their search results, they should immediately be drawn to it and want to click. If you want a product where people will be amazed when they scroll through your photos and want to buy it. They you have to work and sweat and make your product beautiful.

Don’t stint on samples!

I hear complaining all the time about how suppliers want to charge for samples and whether it’s worth paying for. Let me tell you, it is. If you are going down the private label route, you’re going to be spending thousands of pounds, tens of thousands, don’t be cheap about the research. Don’t go too far and get 20 products when you know the 10th is really really good, but take the time to find that 10th products that is really really good. If you can’t afford to get the proper samples, can you really afford to get into private label?

The room is not mass producing cheap crap, it’s being the Apple iPhone of your category. China is the kings of cheap products, but there are still manufacturers where the designs are fantastic and the quality controls are rigorous. Even if you don’t design your own products,at least you can pick one that is still good.

You either have to do research designing your own product, or you have to do research in looking for a great design. Regardless, you have to do the work. Warren Buffett used to say, “You can either create value, or find value.”

#104 Finding a Killer Amazon Product Part 4: Check Competition!

Competition - Brand Dominance

Competition – Brand Dominance

The next thing to do IF your product has good demand at a fair price (so probably over $30 at least), the next thing to do is to check the competition.

Here we look first at brand dominance. This comes in two forms:

  1. A big, well-known brand which takes a lot of the market at the higher price points

If you’re in the Cookware space, for example, if you see a product like “Russell Hobbs” and you can see that the spread of prices is $15-30 but only Russell Hobbs is commanding $25-30 a unit sales price whereas the rest only make $15-23, I’d be wary of entering that space

2. A private label type brand

You may well be able to beat these guys because they don’t have a large brand. But you need to have a really really visually differentiated product. Otherwise – you’ll just end up getting shopped on price. Amazon ads costs go up  – selling price comes down – profit disappears.

This is an incredibly common pattern – do not ignore differentiation! If you don’t think you can beat similar competition that is well established with a genuinely different and better product, DO NOT go into that market!

If you are considering selling price, I’d advise aiming for $30-40 upwards. It leaves a decent profit margin after Amazon ads, and means you’re less likely to enter into wars on price because price was not your main selling point in the first place. Both of which protect your overall profit margin.

Just because a product may cost more per unit, doesn’t mean that the upfront costs will require a huge budget. Most MOQs (minimum Order Quantities) from Chinese suppliers are in reality more like minimum amounts per order. So as long as you are spending $2000+, you can often get away with much lower MOQs than advertised.

Next we look into projected P & L in more detail.

But remember: Eliminate before you Investigate! Don’t spend valuable time analysing products you should just eliminate.